Travel to Germany

Germany is located in central Europe and stretches from the Alps in the south up to the North Sea in the North. It is bordered by Austria and Switzerland in the south; Poland and the Czech Republic in the east; France, Luxembourg, Belgium and the Netherlands in the west; and Denmark in the North.

With some of the largest cities in Europe, Germany offers all travellers a unique experience.

The south of Germany is ideal for the outdoor and adventure type. Within Germany’s border lies a portion of the Alps’ Mountain range; two of Europe’s largest rivers: the Rhine and the Danube; and the scenic Black Forest.

In any of Germany’s cities a relaxing holiday can be enjoyed at any time of the year. Their large cities are ideal for shoppers. Weekly markets are held in all towns and the Christmas markets usually start at the end of November.

The currency of Germany is the Euro, and visitors from outside the EU zone are entitled to a VAT refund on any non-edible goods that are bought in German shops.

The German people are known for their efficiency, and this is reflected right through their transport system. Their rail system is first class and makes travelling from city to city a true pleasure. Most of the large German cities have an underground rail system with a frequent snappy service.

The climate of Germany differs – in the east the summers are very warm and the winter months are very cold. In the north the weather is very cool during the summer and the winters stay mild.

Autumn is the most popular time to travel to Germany. Most German cities hold culture festivals during September and October. If you travel to Germany during the month of October make sure you visit the city of Munich – here you can experience the largest beer festival in the world and sample some of the best beers that are brewed in Germany.

Music festivals are normally held during the summer and autumn months. Special music festivals are held yearly for famous composers. For Beethoven the festival is normally held in Bonn and in the state of Thuringia a festival is normally held for Bach.

Winter holidays are extremely enjoyable in Bavaria, the largest of Germany’s 16 states, where you can enjoy a skiing break in the Alps and the Black Forest.

With over 2000 museums, Germany has a rich culture in art and literature. Eight Germans have won the Nobel Prize for literature. The month of October also holds another large festival – in the second week of October, Frankfurt holds the largest book fair in the world which attracts writers and publishers from all parts of the globe.

So if you are travelling to Germany you have 14 international airports to choose from – where connecting flights can be made to most German cities.

5 Tips to Handle Your Phone While Traveling Abroad

“Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the world all of one’s lifetime.” These are the words of famous writer Mark Twain that describes beautifully about the reason we travel. We do it for fun, enjoyment and to break from our daily mundane routine. It is really nice to feel the sun on our back, or see the wonders that travelling to a new place can provide us. Going to a new place is always etched to our memory and nothing feels good than capturing the splendid moments we spent on as pictures or videos and sharing them with people we love. We have every social network at our disposal and it is a great loss to not be able to share our memories on them.

Moreover, as we are stranger in the new place, we always look for maps to navigate our ways through the landscapes. All of these are possible today at a single click on our mobile phones. It helps us to find place places to our liking through navigation, captures photos and videos and let us to be connected to our close friends and family. It is thus, very important to handle our phones efficiently so that it doesn’t run out of juice when we need it the most.

Tips to handle your phone:-

1. The first thing you need to do is download a travel app like Hopper, Kayak or NobelApp. This app shows the best deal going around the place you visit including cab fares, hotel rents and flight fares. Some apps like NobelApp also provide promotional deals which makes your travel quite cheap.

2. Using your phone is a necessity while travelling and it can drain your battery very quickly. It may not be possible for you find a charging point and you may miss out on important opportunities for a long time. To counter this problem, you must always carry an extra set of batteries and a power bank which can keep your phone charged on the go, and you won’t have to rue over lost chances.

3. When you travel to a different place calling home could be very expensive. Always carry an international calling card like Nobel Phone Cards to get over the situation. It makes you calls cheap and provides quality reception even if you are travelling outside your home network.

4. Try to get a Local SIM card to avoid high expenditure on you roaming SIM card. You can get a lot of offers on the local SIM cards which can make your travel less expensive.

5. Always carry extra memory cards for storing the photos and movies you have clicked so that you don’t have to compromise on the memories of the most pleasant moments

Travelling also makes you vulnerable to a huge expense and the security of your belongings in a foreign land. You must always look for appropriate travel insurance and include your gadgets in it to avoid any mishaps. After all you didn’t go for a vacation just to return with distress and disappointment.

Travel in India – A Journey Called Life

To travel is to willfully leap into the unknown – to give up the secured confines of home and wander into the exigencies of the world. This is true whether one journeys from home to a nearby town to see an event, or lose oneself in the sights and smells of a ‘Mela’ (fair), or to another continent in search of work. Over time, the world and its moralities seep into our lives and into our hearts. In doing so we come closer, howsoever marginally; to becoming – as the Greek philosopher Diogenes first called himself – a “citizen of the world”.

Predictably, travel arouses a swirl of responses in us. The world can either repel or inspire us in its reflections. But for a majority of travelers, travel forces their minds to think, to adapt, to reevaluate the prejudices and to gauge the responses in ways far removed from what they have been perceived to view. Travel in short is learning while on the move.

For many like me, the journey is always the destination – the essence of the short trip or the long journey always lies in the million ‘Chai’ (Tea) stops, the smiles or gurgling laughter of a baby, those impromptu romances between co-teen travelers, a lazy cow lying in the middle of the road and refusing to move, or a sudden downpour that hits the window panes and reduces the visibility to just a thin streak of light of a vehicle in the distance, in watching the green canopy of trees that welcomes every thoroughfarer with their arch, in washing my face and feet at a small gushing stream, in watching the outline of a small hillock from the distance, and sometimes, in just doing and thinking nothing at all…

Predictably, the idea of India as a traveler’s paradise – whether as a geographical or cultural space – is increasingly distorted in the minds of many. Many perceive travelling as the kind they see in Bollywood movies while the more privileged know more about Dubai or Venice than they do say about Bhubaneshwar or Shillong. Many parts of India are virtually foreign to many young minds, though no real fault of theirs. Who wants to ‘think’ about a Nizamabad when there is a jet plane taking off to Singapore? Our collective consciousness is slowly getting fragmented along the comfortable lines of global travel than the rustic feel of one’s soil.

Should this matter? Yes.

In a heterogeneous democracy like ours, where resources and geographies are vastly varied, where peoples, cultures, food, language change with every district – it is paramount that we see past our immediate environs. Our collective challenge is then — how do we offer, to the generations of Indians to recognize our collective destiny? Our soil and its manifold beauties. Lester Pearson, the late Canadian Prime Minister, said in his Nobel Peace Prize Lecture: “How can there be peace without people understanding each other, and how can this be if they don’t know each other?” To him, and to all of us, knowledge of the other was to simplify, to get past the banal and to learn to treat each individual according to their character. And the best way to do this is to travel. To explicitly encourage personal explorations within India and make India more accessible.