How About An Environmental Travel Kenya Safari

Ever heard of the famous Professor Wangari Maathai? She is a Nobel Peace Price Laurreate, the Member of Parliament for Tetu Constitituency, the founder and leader of the Green Belt Movement. With so many attributes to her name, she is the so down to earth Lady that you may not pick up from the large crowds she pulls campaining for the conservation of the environment both Globally and in Kenya, where she was born and Brought up.

Like in many many other countries in the world, Kenya has had its share of deforestation through illegal logging, land degradation by use rudimentally farming practices and burning of fossil fuels leading to the Global warming threat, where the world is expected to warm up by over 2 degrees centgrade over the next 100 years. It expected that increased temperature changes could lead to drastic and erratic weather changes with some parts of the world becoming either too hot or too cold. This is going to affect food production to an ever growing population especially in the less deveoped african countries making human survival harder than in any other period in the history of mankind.

Professor Wangari Maathai has has taken the leading role in organising communities and Non-Governmental organizations into condemming land grabbing, degazettement of forest land and illegal logging, throgh her Green Belt movement. Many youth groups and women organizations have taken the cue from her and started indigenous tree nurseries all over kenya. These initiatives are going to change the face of Kenya, making your dreams of that covetted Safari even more interesting, imagine all the bare countryside coming to life with lush green indegenous trees that save our soils from the from raging rain waters running into the rivers that feed our National animal conservatories.

As a tourist in Kenya, you could get involved. Lets call it an environmental Safari. You could help plant a tree or two. Let us exchange views. What is your country doing to conserve the environment? What lessons can Kenyans learn from from your countrys’ conservation efforts? Do you have an alternative to fuel wood that 90% of kenyans use? What will Kenya do with the menace of plastic waste management? The list is endless, but the options are there with you and the whole lot of us will appreciate.

Kenyans are a very hospitable people. They wil not mind to host you as a tourist as you travel to other covetted tourist destinations scattered all over the country. Talk of budget travel and you have it, it cannot come cheaper. There are many diverse tribes in Kenya and you are sure to be treated to the many traditional cuisine that are prepared in the countryside. You will also be treated to the many cultural events, unique to each cultural group.