The Nobel Prize in Nursing – A Recognition Whose Time Has Come

Think about all the endless hours the nurses spend in all the emergency rooms, intensive care units, hospitals and clinics of the world, tending the sick, healing the wounded, and bringing light, hope and better health to the millions around the globe…

Think about the qualifications they bring to such a critical public function and what would have happened if they weren’t there in the congested hospitals and battle fields of the world?

Isn’t that a service equal in importance to the one delivered by a Nobel-price winner author, doctor, or politician? Ask the millions who have experienced the magical presence of a professional nurse next to their operating table or hospital bed, and the answer will be a resounding “Yes!”

So why is there not a similar Nobel prize for the Nurses, recognizing at least one “healing angel” on behalf of all the other countless healthcare providers, honoring them and recognizing their indisputable contribution to the world health and peace?
A Baltimore Sun op-ed penned by Columbia University nursing professor Kristine Gebbie and Center for Nursing Advocacy executive director Sandy Summers has raised the same excellent question and we hope it won’t be the last.
If there is a Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, why not also have one in Nursing?

After recalling the contributions of some truly exceptional nurses like Florence Nightingale (1820-1910), Mary Breckinridge (1881-1965), Susie Kim, and Elizabeth Ngugi, the authors make the following observations:

“Who cares whether nurses win international prizes? We all should. The world is struggling with the lethal effects of a nursing shortage, and the related migration of nurses away from the neediest countries – due in part to a lack of understanding of the nature and value of the profession. The recognition that comes with such prizes could greatly benefit the public’s health by proclaiming to the world, from preschoolers to national leaders, that nursing is one of the most vital fields of human endeavor.”

Given the fact that the existing Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine recognizes only the scientific research in medicine, we clearly need a new category to honor the indisputable contribution nurses make to our lives.

Alfred Nobel – A Name That Needs No Introduction

Alfred Nobel born on 21st October 1833 in Stockholm, Sweden was a Swedish chemist, innovator, engineer, and an industrialist. He invented dynamite, Bofors and many more things which led to the technological revolution during his era. He invested a part of his wealth to posthumously start Nobel Prize.

Family background

Alfred Nobel was the fourth son of Andriette Ahlsell and Immanuel Nobel. His father, Immanuel Nobel was an inventor and engineer who constructed buildings and bridges in Stockholm, Sweden. During the construction work Immanuel Nobel used to try different techniques of blasting rocks. His mother Andriette Ahlsell belonged from a wealthy family. Due to the heavy loss in the construction work, Immanuel Nobel became Bankrupt in the year 1833, the same year Alfred was born. Then in the year 1837, Immanuel Nobel leaving his family in Stockholm, moved to Finland to start a new career. Meanwhile Alfred’s mother Andriette Ahlsell started a grocery shop in Stockholm in order to support and feed her family. Immanuel Nobel started a mechanical shop in St. Petersburg, Russia which manufactured equipments for the Russian Army. His new business became very successful and as a result of this he was able to bring his family to St. Petersburg, Russia in the year 1842.

Education

After moving to Russia his father enrolled him and his brothers into the top school of Russia. Immanuel Nobel wanted his sons to join the family business as engineers after finishing their education. But, initially Alfred was interested more in poetry than chemicals. Noticing this, Immanuel Nobel sent Alfred Nobel abroad for a two years training program in chemical engineering. During the training program Alfred visited France, Germany, Sweden and United States. During his training program Alfred also met Ascanio Sobrero, the person who invented Nitroglycerine in Paris. Nitroglycerine is a highly explosive liquid with its explosive power much more than gunpowder but it is very unstable.

Work

Because of the aforementioned property of Nitroglycerine Alfred Nobel became interested in it and started thinking about how to use it for practical use. In the year 1852, He returned back to Russia to join his family business, which was growing at an enormous rate at that time. But after the war ended the Nobel family again turned into bankruptcy and they returned back to Sweden in the year 1863. After returning back to Sweden He invested most of his time in experimenting with Nitroglycerine. He conducted various experiments to use nitroglycerine as an explosive. Finally, in the year 1867 Nobel succeeded in his experiments and invented Dynamite (a mixture of nitroglycerine and kieselguhr). He patented Dynamite under his name. In order to detonate or blast the dynamite rods he also invented a blasting cap or detonator which can be ignited by lightning a fuse.

As a businessman

Alfred Nobel was also a very successful Businessman and entrepreneur. By the year 1865, the market and demand for dynamite and blasting cap increased at an enormous rate. His factory in Krummel, Germany started exporting dynamite to other countries in America, Australia and Europe. He went on to establish around 90 laboratories and factories in more than 20 countries around the world. Apart from explosives, Alfred Nobel also focused on the development of other chemical products such as: leather, rubber, artificial silk, etc.

Personal life

Alfred Nobel had to travel a lot because of his vast business empire. But he spent a major part of his life in Paris.

Travel to Germany

Germany is located in central Europe and stretches from the Alps in the south up to the North Sea in the North. It is bordered by Austria and Switzerland in the south; Poland and the Czech Republic in the east; France, Luxembourg, Belgium and the Netherlands in the west; and Denmark in the North.

With some of the largest cities in Europe, Germany offers all travellers a unique experience.

The south of Germany is ideal for the outdoor and adventure type. Within Germany’s border lies a portion of the Alps’ Mountain range; two of Europe’s largest rivers: the Rhine and the Danube; and the scenic Black Forest.

In any of Germany’s cities a relaxing holiday can be enjoyed at any time of the year. Their large cities are ideal for shoppers. Weekly markets are held in all towns and the Christmas markets usually start at the end of November.

The currency of Germany is the Euro, and visitors from outside the EU zone are entitled to a VAT refund on any non-edible goods that are bought in German shops.

The German people are known for their efficiency, and this is reflected right through their transport system. Their rail system is first class and makes travelling from city to city a true pleasure. Most of the large German cities have an underground rail system with a frequent snappy service.

The climate of Germany differs – in the east the summers are very warm and the winter months are very cold. In the north the weather is very cool during the summer and the winters stay mild.

Autumn is the most popular time to travel to Germany. Most German cities hold culture festivals during September and October. If you travel to Germany during the month of October make sure you visit the city of Munich – here you can experience the largest beer festival in the world and sample some of the best beers that are brewed in Germany.

Music festivals are normally held during the summer and autumn months. Special music festivals are held yearly for famous composers. For Beethoven the festival is normally held in Bonn and in the state of Thuringia a festival is normally held for Bach.

Winter holidays are extremely enjoyable in Bavaria, the largest of Germany’s 16 states, where you can enjoy a skiing break in the Alps and the Black Forest.

With over 2000 museums, Germany has a rich culture in art and literature. Eight Germans have won the Nobel Prize for literature. The month of October also holds another large festival – in the second week of October, Frankfurt holds the largest book fair in the world which attracts writers and publishers from all parts of the globe.

So if you are travelling to Germany you have 14 international airports to choose from – where connecting flights can be made to most German cities.